Thoracic Injuries

Chest injuries account for 25% of trauma deaths, approximately 15% of traumatic chest injuries require operative intervention; the remaining 85% can be managed in the ED.

Chest injuries may be either penetrating or blunt injuries, and the mechanism of injury determines the work-up and intervention.

The incidence of thoracic trauma varies from country to country as this depends on various factors like road rules, speed limits etc.

The rate of thoracic trauma in the United States is 12 per million population per day - and 20-25% of deaths due to trauma are attributed to thoracic injury.

It is estimated that thoracic trauma is responsible of approximately 16,000 deaths per year in the United States.

The incidence has increased rapidly in this century of high-speed vehicular travel.

Immediate deaths are usually due to major disruption of the heart or of great vessels.

Early deaths due to thoracic trauma occurring within 30 minutes to three hours after the injury are secondary to cardiac tamponade, airway obstruction and aspiration.

Two thirds of these patients reach the hospital alive.

Only 10-15% of blunt trauma requires thoracic surgery, while 15-30% of the penetrating chest trauma requires open thoracotomy.

The majority of patients with thoracic trauma can be managed by simple lifesaving maneuvers that do not require surgical treatment.

Thoracic injury occurs in the chest wall, lungs and pleura, thoracic great vessels, diaphragm, heart, trachea, bronchus and esophagus.

The magnitude of these problems and the significance of the associated injuries serve to underscore the importance of thorough evaluation and timely intervention in the management of thoracic trauma.

Many patients can be successfully treated with tube thoracotomy, respiratory support and less commonly, emergency thoracotomy.

Tracheal intubation supports and treats post-traumatic respiratory insufficiency.

Although some of the complex and potentially fatal traumatic thoracic injuries require emergent surgical intervention, most of them can be treated nonoperatively by the proper application of certain fundamental principles of initial trauma management.

These principles can substantially reduce both morbidity and mortality.

Appropriate early management of the rapidly fatal and potentially fatal thoracic injuries can also significantly decrease the late complications.

Click here for our orthopaedic range for the back, spine and torso

Chest injuries account for 25% of trauma deaths, approximately 15% of traumatic chest injuries require operative intervention; the remaining 85% can be managed in the ED.

Chest injuries may be either penetrating or blunt

...

The incidence of thoracic trauma varies from country to country as this depends on various factors like road rules, speed limits etc.

The rate of thoracic trauma in the United States is 12 per million population per day - and 20-25% of deaths due to trauma are attributed to thoracic injury.

It is estimated that thoracic trauma is responsible of approximately 16,000 deaths per year in the United States.

The incidence has increased rapidly in this century of high-speed vehicular travel.

Immediate deaths are usually due to major disruption of the heart or of great vessels.

Early deaths due to thoracic trauma occurring within 30 minutes to three hours after the injury are secondary to cardiac tamponade, airway obstruction and aspiration.

Two thirds of these patients reach the hospital alive.

Only 10-15% of blunt trauma requires thoracic surgery, while 15-30% of the penetrating chest trauma requires open thoracotomy.

The majority of patients with thoracic trauma can be managed by simple lifesaving maneuvers that do not require surgical treatment.

Thoracic injury occurs in the chest wall, lungs and pleura, thoracic great vessels, diaphragm, heart, trachea, bronchus and esophagus.

The magnitude of these problems and the significance of the associated injuries serve to underscore the importance of thorough evaluation and timely intervention in the management of thoracic trauma.

Many patients can be successfully treated with tube thoracotomy, respiratory support and less commonly, emergency thoracotomy.

Tracheal intubation supports and treats post-traumatic respiratory insufficiency.

Although some of the complex and potentially fatal traumatic thoracic injuries require emergent surgical intervention, most of them can be treated nonoperatively by the proper application of certain fundamental principles of initial trauma management.

These principles can substantially reduce both morbidity and mortality.

Appropriate early management of the rapidly fatal and potentially fatal thoracic injuries can also significantly decrease the late complications.

Click here for our orthopaedic range for the back, spine and torso

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